Tuesday, October 21, 2008

WORLD BLOG TOUR - WIN!!!


Read on. . .

All you need to do is comment on my blog after
reading Cate Prato's
answers to my questions on her new book -
"Mixed Media Self Portraits"
Remember, comments that you add to my blog
will automatically enter your name to
be eligible for winning her book!


Here it is..... answers to some burning questions directed to Cate Prato
author of the newest and hottest book to hit the market...

MIXED MEDIA SELF PORTRAITS

Random Arts asks Cate:
It appears that you have put a lot of thought into

taking the fear out of creating self portraits.
What steps did you take to feel comfortable about the process?

Cate replies:We definitely made a point of easing people into the process
of making self-portraits. First, I explain the history of the genre—all the
best artists have done it, so you shouldn’t feel self-conscious about it. Second,
I got two of the very best essayists I know to write about their awkward feelings
about examining themselves in the mirror: Cheryl Prater for her humorous
approach (of course) and Loretta Marvel for a more poignant
and thoughtful self-examination. Then, I have a series of “warm-up” exercises.
Finally, I hope the sheer variety of self-portraits included in the book—
from mixed-media photography to journal dolls to
assemblage will encourage readers to shake off
their anxiety about self-portraiture and dive in.

Random Arts asks Cate:
What about realism?

Most of us feel and have the impression that
a portrait should look exactly like the person?
How do you feel about that?


Cate replies: Realism is overrated! Even Rembrandt—

who made scores of self-portraits over the course of his life—
“disguised” himself with costumes, props, and so on to achieve
different results that informed his art. In the book we show
how a self-portrait can express “you” or
teach you something about yourself without being a
literal likeness.
It can be a book about the year you were born, as
Debbi Crane’s 1967 mixed-media fabric book or a
“snapshot” of time like Kelly Rae Roberts’ painted collage,
or Jenn Mason’s found object assemblage, where each item represents a
part of her life and her personality.

Random Arts asks Cate:
How does "personality" play into the creation

of a self portrait?

Cate replies: I guess I would say one’s personality
shapes one’s self-portrait, from the colors and
techniques you use to make it to the purpose of making
it to the style of self-portrait you choose. And that can change
from one day to the next. The best part of making creative
self-portraits is that it is, truly, all about you. And you can
do it any way you want. It’s like being a kid again.


Now, all you need to do is comment on Cate's
answers or my questions, for that point.
Remember, comments that you make will
be eligible for winning a free book
from Cate Prato.

14 comments:

  1. Joyce8:02 AM

    Your comment "realism is overrated" is like a get out of jail free card.
    I also like the notion that the self-portrait is fluid and changes over time.

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  2. I think the idea of "warm up exercises" is a good one. I value some of the studies I do BEFORE I start a project as much as the finished item sometimes. I just never thought of applying that idea to a self-portrait. I would love to do a self portrait in fabric, maybe sooner than later.
    Happy days,
    Joanie

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  3. The idea that one's personality should come through in a self-portrait takes the pressure off. I always had the idea that it had to look like me, and if you think about it, most self-portraits look rather grim. I can imagine doing a self portrait that is me using creative materials, not a photo image of myself. Thank you for that freedom!

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  4. I love what Joyce said about the "get out of jail free" card! It is less frightening to know that no one expects a realistic portrait. From year to year our vision of who and what we are DOES change...as our portrayal of that probably would. I can't wait to see Cate's book!

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  5. Cindy Trobaugh10:36 AM

    I was especially interested in using found objects or your birth year as a way of doing a self-portrait. It is much more explanatory. And thanks, Jane, for adding the comment button!!

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  6. I like the idea of being able to capture the nuances of my personality in my own creation ... and any art that is like being a kid again is my kind of art. Thanks for the chance to win.

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  7. The idea of making a self portrait that does't physically look like me is a new concept. I'm interested in exploring that more.

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  8. Connie McGinnis2:01 PM

    I love the idea of not taking yourself so seriously by attempting a mirror image portrait! You've already given me some great ideas.

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  9. I would say a self portrait is more than your outward appearance- we tend to look at our 'faces' when we do self portraits - it's about what's inside as well. And I love color - so I'd paint myself purple, red and blue! I've done self portraits in pencil with my non-dominant hand (left)...wow, what a shock! I actually liked what I drew and it 'looked' like me! Jamie V in MT
    amzanioli@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
  10. I would say a self portrait is more than your outward appearance- we tend to look at our 'faces' when we do self portraits - it's about what's inside as well. And I love color - so I'd paint myself purple, red and blue! I've done self portraits in pencil with my non-dominant hand (left)...wow, what a shock! I actually liked what I drew and it 'looked' like me! Jamie V in MT
    amzanioli@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
  11. Reality is overrated - how true!! Self is about so much more than outward physical appearance. If I want to record what someone looks like, I'll take a picture; if I want to know what a person is about, well, that's a different story!
    hugs,
    patti

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  12. p.s. What I meant to say, is Realism, not reality, though I guess the same applies - lol.

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  13. I can't wait to read the process that helps ease you into making self portraits. Having no artistic background, my fear has blocked me from learning how to let loose.

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  14. lauren3:28 PM

    jane, you are amazing!
    Lauren

    ReplyDelete